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Nov 7

NOV 7

3:00 PM–5:00 PM

EAST GALLERY, BUELL HALL

Michel Foucault: The Late Lectures

3:00 PM–5:00 PM    East Gallery, Buell Hall

Lecture:

Michel Foucault: The Late Lectures

A panel discussion with Seyla Benhabib, François Ewald, Bernard E. Harcourt, George Kateb, and Emmanuelle Saada

In his late Collège de France lectures, Michel Foucault opened up new paths for research, what he so often referred to as "des pistes de recherche," many of which have only come to light now as a result of the recent publication of the lectures. Ranging from the concept of security to the notion of truth-telling, to the relationship between veridiction and juridiction, to the arts of governing, the hermeneutics of the self, and the notion of "voluntary inservitude," the late lectures represent a font of new material to allow us to think with Foucault. At the same time, they offer a new lens through which to reread the earlier published works, from the History of Madness, though Discipline and Punish, to the History of Sexuality. This colloquium will discuss a number of the ideas and concepts that were born and sketched out in the lectures, but that remain today still to be explored. 

Seyla Benhabib, Eugene Meyer Professor of Political Science & Philosophy, Yale University

François Ewald, Professor Emeritus, Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers

Bernard E. Harcourt, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, and Director, Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought, Columbia University

George Kateb, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Politics, Emeritus, Princeton University

Emmanuelle Saada, Associate Professor of French and History, Columbia University (moderator)

Event co-sponsored by the Columbia Maison Française, Center for Contemporary Critical Thought and Heyman Center for the Humanities


Participant Bios:

Seyla Benhabib, Eugene Meyer Professor of Political Science & Philosophy, Yale University

Seyla Benhabib is the Eugene Meyer Professor of Political Science and Philosophy at Yale University and was Director of the Program in Ethics, Politics and Economics (2002-2008). Her most recent books include Dignity in Adversity. Human Rights in Troubled Times (Polity Press, 2011); Equality and Difference. Human Dignity and Popular Sovereignty in the Mirror of Political Modernity (Lucas prize Lecture in English and German: Mohr Siebeck Publishers, 2013) and The Democratic Disconnect. Citizenship and Accountability in the Transatlantic Community, with David Cameron et. al. (Transatlantic Academy, Washington DC, 2013). Just this April 2014, Professor Benhabib was awarded the Meister Eckhart prize, one of the most prestigious philosophy prizes in Germany. Her other honors include the Ernst Bloch prize (2009) for her contributions to cultural dialogue in a global civilization and the Leopold Lucas Prize of the Evangelical Academy of Tubingen (2012).  

François Ewald, Professor Emeritus, Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers

François Ewald recently retired as professor of insurance at the Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers (Paris) and as director of the Ecole Nationale d’Assurances (Paris). His research interests are in the fields of risk and the philosophy of risk, and his publications include L’Etat providence (1986), and Le Principe de precaution (2001, 2008). Born in Paris, François Ewald pursued his interests in philosophy, law and psychoanalysis at university and obtained his Ph.D. in political science from the Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Paris). He was Michel Foucault’s assistant at the Collège de France (Paris) and has overseen the publication of much of Foucault's literary estate. He is the editor of Michel Foucault’s Dits et Ecrits (with Daniel Defert) and of Michel Foucault’s lessons at the Collège de France (with Alessandro Fontana).

Bernard E. Harcourt, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law and Director, Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought, Columbia; directeur d’études, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales

Bernard E. Harcourt joined the Columbia Law School faculty in July 2014. His scholarship intersects social and political theory, the sociology of punishment, and penal law and procedure. He is the author most recently of The Illusion of Free Markets: Punishment and the Myth of Natural Order (Harvard University Press 2011) and of Occupy: Three Inquiries in Disobedience (with W. J. T. Mitchell and Michael Taussig, University of Chicago Press 2013). He is the editor of Michel Foucault’s 1973 Collège de France lectures, La société punitive (Gallimard 2013) and the co-editor of Foucault’s 1981 Louvain lectures, Wrong-Doing, Truth-Telling: The Function of Avowal in Justice (Louvain 2012 & University of Chicago Press 2014).

George Kateb, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Politics, Emeritus, Princeton University

George Kateb is William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Politics, Emeritus. He has been one of the most respected and influential political theorists of the last quarter century. His books include Hannah Arendt: Politics, Conscience, Evil (1984); The Inner Ocean: Individualism and Democratic Culture (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1992); Emerson and Self-Reliance (Sage, 1994; 2d edition Rowman and Littlefield, 2002); and Patriotism and Other Mistakes (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006). He has also written a number of articles on issues involving the Bill of Rights and constitutional law. At Princeton, he was formerly Director of the Program in Political Philosophy, Director of the Gauss Seminars, and Director of the University Center for Human Values.

Emmanuelle Saada, Associate Professor of French and History, Columbia University

Emmanuelle Saada’s main field of research and teaching is the history of the French empire in the 19th and 20th century, with a specific interest in law. Her first book, Les enfants de la colonie: les métis de l'Empire français entre sujétion et citoyenneté, was published in France in 2007 and translated in 2012 under the title Empire’s Children: Race, Filiation and Citizenship in the French Colonies (University of Chicago Press). Emmanuelle Saada is currently writing a historiographical book reflecting on French and European colonization as a history of the present. She is also working on a project on law and violence in Algeria and France in the 19th century.

Michel Foucault: The Late Lectures